Said and Seen

Images/words from me and others.
Claire. Dakar, Senegal, 2013.

Claire. Dakar, Senegal, 2013.

lookatthisstory:

What is beauty? We went to Brazil, the plastic surgery capital of the world, and asked 7 women to talk about it. 

"For me, being beautiful is being skinny," says Thairine (in the pink dress). 

More portraits by Jimmy Chalk + words from Thairine, Janet, Maria and Gisele (above) — and three other women: 

—>  Look At This  <—

recent posts from my the wonderful Claire Harbage.

recent posts from my the wonderful Claire Harbage.

(Source: partsofreality)

A video @skunnkbear and I made. Connecting the dots of evolution through a glass of beer.

skunkbear:

Watch our latest video to find out what the history of the earth, ancient whales and the evolution of Homo sapiens have to do with a single pint of beer.

And if you can’t get enough of beer science, check out jtotheizzoe's recent video and my old scientific drinking song.

(via npr)

nprglobalhealth:

Scientists Step Up Food Fraud Efforts Following Horse Meat Scandal
Last year, the great European horse meat scandal alerted consumers around the world to food fraud. Traces of horse meat were found in Ikea meatballs and Burger King beef patties, in cottage pies sold at schools in Lancashire, England, and in frozen lasagna sold all over Europe. Arrests were made in the U.K. and in France.
The contamination didn’t pose any real public health threat — horse has the same amount of protein as beef, and less fat. But in the U.K., where horses are viewed as pets rather than food, people weren’t happy to learn they had been eating horse unawares. And as we reported, in France, where eating horse is more common, customers were angry that they had been paying beef prices for cheaper horse meat.
"Consumers felt cheated and lost trust. It was just a total loss of confidence in the supply chain," says Markus Lipp of U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention, a nonprofit that sets food and medicine safety standards. “It raised questions: Were these racehorses? Were they treated with veterinary medicines that were bad for human consumption?”
As a result of the scandal, European governments started rethinking their food regulation practices. And scientists started kicking into high gear, looking for ways to improve the technology to quickly test batches of meat for contaminants. Just this month, a paper in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry details a new method that uses mass spectrometry to quickly detect even tiny traces of pork and horse mixed into raw and cooked beef products.
The new technology looks promising, Lipp says. “But there is no way [food regulators] can test 100 percent of the food. We can never test ourselves to safety.”
Continue reading.
Photo: The French enjoy horse meat — here’s a horse meat butcher in Paris. But even the French were angry that they had been paying beef prices for it last year. (Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)

nprglobalhealth:

Scientists Step Up Food Fraud Efforts Following Horse Meat Scandal

Last year, the great European horse meat scandal alerted consumers around the world to food fraud. Traces of horse meat were found in Ikea meatballs and Burger King beef patties, in cottage pies sold at schools in Lancashire, England, and in frozen lasagna sold all over Europe. Arrests were made in the U.K. and in France.

The contamination didn’t pose any real public health threat — horse has the same amount of protein as beef, and less fat. But in the U.K., where horses are viewed as pets rather than food, people weren’t happy to learn they had been eating horse unawares. And as we reported, in France, where eating horse is more common, customers were angry that they had been paying beef prices for cheaper horse meat.

"Consumers felt cheated and lost trust. It was just a total loss of confidence in the supply chain," says Markus Lipp of U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention, a nonprofit that sets food and medicine safety standards. “It raised questions: Were these racehorses? Were they treated with veterinary medicines that were bad for human consumption?”

As a result of the scandal, European governments started rethinking their food regulation practices. And scientists started kicking into high gear, looking for ways to improve the technology to quickly test batches of meat for contaminants. Just this month, a paper in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry details a new method that uses mass spectrometry to quickly detect even tiny traces of pork and horse mixed into raw and cooked beef products.

The new technology looks promising, Lipp says. “But there is no way [food regulators] can test 100 percent of the food. We can never test ourselves to safety.”

Continue reading.

Photo: The French enjoy horse meat — here’s a horse meat butcher in Paris. But even the French were angry that they had been paying beef prices for it last year. (Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)

Outtake from previous Goats and Soda shoot. Mathew Fred, Liberian activist.

Outtake from previous Goats and Soda shoot. Mathew Fred, Liberian activist.

This was a good trip. Mauritania 2013. On the iron ore train. Nouadhibou, Nouakchot to Zouerat. Here the wonderful partsofreality stops at St. Exupery’s house.

Keeping Up With The Interns: First Summer Roundup

nprinterns:

The cool thing about working at NPR is the richness and diversity of its internship program. The interns are from all over the country and they’re at just about every desk and department at 1111 North Capitol Street.

Here’s a roundup of what some of us have been working on. Some of these stories…